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Autobiography: Written in Ink

By Amy Jackson
Staff Reporter

The epidemic is quietly stealing through the village piercing the flesh with painterly precision. There have been stereotypes going around about girls who rock “ink” bling. Half a century ago, under a Grace Kelly-like demeanor it was unheard of for a woman to have a tattoo. Women who ventured to break out of the Stepford restraints were seen as rebels. However, celebrities like the bluesy songbird Janis Joplin changed all of that making it hippie chic to have girl’s new best friend.

Tattoos today are widespread

Tattoos today are much less a sign of rebellion and more so a personal statement. Photo via Teen Vogue.

Now tattooed women are accepted because now they are seen as sexy fleshful fantasies. In the 21st century tats are revered as the devastatingly cool must have accessory. All types of women are engaging in the tattoo rush: burnouts, fallen angels, and America’s sweetheart. So Teen Vogue proposed a question. “Are girls being inspired to get ink stained by their favorite actress?” While some girls may be influenced by celebrity girls while others have their own testament of inspiration. Several young ladies of Wesleyan willingly shared their own tattoo history.

I’m going to call these girls the magnificent seven. Out all of the tattoo stories shared only one is a rebellious tat. Bre’Ana Solmone is the mistress of this rebellious mark. On her shoulder there is a B to immortalize her teenage revolt. Most of the girls however were using their ink to pay tribute to a loved one. Jesse Groves got a tattoo in memory of grandfather. Groves’ inscription reads “Do Your Best” because that was the advice her grandfather always gave her. Kendal Binion’s tattoo was in memory of her grandmother’s Christian legacy. So on her shoulder rests an angel. Binion says “I chose an angel because that is the first thing that I think of when think about my Coco (that’s what I call my grandmother).”

Taylor Bishop’s twins were supposed to be senior year treats for her feet but after seeing her heart’s desire commemorated on another she couldn’t wait. So the next week Bishop got twin Borneo roses behind her ears. Megan Wagner’s tattoos are reminders to her to always be a Russian roulette player. She has a pair of dice on her bikini line while there’s a hand of cards (ace of spades, jack of diamonds, king and queen of hearts, and a joker). Wagner’s newest tattoo project will entail a pirate ship covering her whole rib cage with an inscription stating, “Every Saint has a Past, and Every Sinner has a Future” beneath an anchor piercing her skin. Wagner says that it is to symbolize “settling into who she is and accepting herself”.

Margret Higgins was inspired by brave women who have under gone mastectomies and got tattoos to cover their scars. Higgins said, “At first that’s what I equated my tattoos too. I felt they cover emotional scars that I carry with me.” The last tattoo that will complete her belt has been in the works for a year. This butterfly will have a thunderbird feel to it. Higgins feels that her tattoos are a celebration to remind her of those she loves. Chelsea Cox has a tattoo of a clover and in the middle of it is “Lucky” written in an Asian language. And for Cox her tattoo proved to be true. A week later she began dating the man that is now her fiancé. Cox says, “So I look at my tattoo as a like a commitment to this remarkable relationship I am in, and moving on from my past life into a life that is more lucky.”

The history behind the magnificent seven’s stories are inspiring and powerful. Megan Fox has several poetic tattoos including one of Marilyn Monroe on her arm. In Elle magazine, she sums up her tattoo history fiercely tying it with a chain. “Every time I get another tattoo, it’s like a little F-you to anyone who told me not to.” There’s no denying that a little ink can go a long way.

Thanks ladies for all those who gave feedback on their tattoos. You guys rock!
-AJ

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About wesleyanword

The Wesleyan Word is the official student newspaper of Wesleyan College. Operated and produced by students, The Word is printed twice per month during the fall and spring semesters. Online editions are released every Wednesday throughout the school year. Wesleyan College is a 4-year private residential college for women in Macon, Georgia. Established in 1836, Wesleyan College is the first college in the world to charter degrees to women.

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